Seeing Green

Students, community work to restore greenhouse

In+September%2C+students+remove+overgrown+vines+during+the+greenhouse+restoration.++The+project+coordinated+student+organizations%2C+individuals+and+local+community+groups.
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Seeing Green

In September, students remove overgrown vines during the greenhouse restoration.  The project coordinated student organizations, individuals and local community groups.

In September, students remove overgrown vines during the greenhouse restoration. The project coordinated student organizations, individuals and local community groups.

Photo by: Erica Bridges

In September, students remove overgrown vines during the greenhouse restoration. The project coordinated student organizations, individuals and local community groups.

Photo by: Erica Bridges

Photo by: Erica Bridges

In September, students remove overgrown vines during the greenhouse restoration. The project coordinated student organizations, individuals and local community groups.

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After years of neglect, students and local organizations are working together to bring new life to the old campus greenhouse, which will mainly be used for hands-on student learning.

Future Farmers of America (FFA) member senior Sam Garcia, initiated the greenhouse project with junior Kennedy Sanchez who is making the restoration part of her Creativity Activity Service (CAS) project for IB.

“I think it’s important to have a place on campus where kids can go and feel comfortable learning,” junior Kennedy Sanchez said.

Sanchez reached out to her CAS supervisor, English teacher Seth Ross, who managed over 20 acres of greenhouses before he started teaching.

“This is very exciting, there will be multiple uses for the greenhouse that will engage students in their learning,” Ross said.

Family Career Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) joined FFA to clean up the greenhouse alongside members of the Denton County Master Gardener Association and Denton County AgriLife Extension Service.

“It felt good to help do something for the school and the community,” FCCLA vice president , senior Raquel Carrillo said.

Before the greenhouse is operational, old equipment has to be replaced. FFA advisor Shelby Weldon, Ross and various students are working together to obtain funding. So far, the Texas Farm Bureau has given $750 to support the rebuilding of the greenhouse.

“We’re trying to submit as many grants as possible,” Weldon. “We submitted an American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture grant and a Denton Public School Foundation grant plus several others.”

When finished, several organizations will benefit from the greenhouse.

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